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Fall 2011 Western athletes introduced strength and conditioning coach Cori Metzger-Deacon

Published: Monday, June 4, 2012

Updated: Monday, June 4, 2012 15:06

cori

Rebecca Miller | Photo Editor

It is no surprise to athletes at Western, but many students who do not participate on a varsity team may not know of the new addition to the athletic department in Fall 2011. Cori Metzgar-Deacon, the Director of Sport Performance started at Western last fall in order to establish a consolidation of the strength and conditioning program. Having this program established means that coaches no longer have to design and implement workout programs for their teams.


Originally from Alaska, Metzgar-Deacon has a strong love for her family, coaching and sports. Her passion for sports and helping athletes perform well is contagious and motivating.


“I am very competitive. I just competed at the Boston Marathon. I love to run and I feel that, [in addition to the students], my own training is very important. It shows the athletes I work with that I am determined. Basically I run and I work,” stated Metzgar-Deacon.


Metzgar-Deacon joins the Wolves after spending the past three years at Washington State University as the strength and conditioning specialist for the baseball, volleyball, soccer and women’s swimming programs. Prior to that, she was the assistant strength and conditioning coach for two years with the Cougars, working with cross country, tennis and rowing programs as well. Metzgar-Deacon also had the opportunity to assist with the football strength and conditioning program every year of her tenure at Washington State University.


Prior to her stay in Pullman, Metzgar-Deacon worked at Colorado State University where she served stints as both the Head and Assistant Strength and Conditioning coach. She also had a two year stop at Ohio State as a Professional Intern Strength and Conditioning Coach, and did her graduate assistantship at Western Michigan.


Metzgar-Deacon is a certified member of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (CSCS), the Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association (SCCC) and USA Weightlifting. She received her bachelor’s degree in exercise science from Fort Lewis College in 1998 and her master’s in Physical Education from Western Michigan in 2000.


“I cannot do everything I want to with each sport since I coach 11 varsity sports and lack time and facilities to do everything. The structure here is the same as the other schools I have been at and I do not feel that DII should be treated any differently. Athletes should take their workouts seriously, treat me and the program with respect and use the opportunity to get better,” stated Metzgar-Deacon.


Coming into the program there were a lot of changes to be made. “First year it was about creating a unified department. Have the same rules and same discipline for each team. They needed to know what was expected of them. With no structure it was hard at first,” stated Metzgar-Deacon. “It took less time than I thought it would. The coaches helped out a lot and the athletes want to get better. I am very happy with our progress the first year.”


Cori has made a major impact on our baseball program at [Western.] She has championship mentality in the weight room. We are so excited as we head into 2012-2013. She will help us get to the national championship,” said the head baseball coach, Jeremiah Robbins.


Ask any team on campus what their goals are and in the list one thing will be the same. Get to championships and advance to the next round.


“Our number one priority is to have the athletes be the best they can be. We want championships and we want to go to Nationals,” stated Metzgar-Deacon.


“It is beneficial to myself and the team having someone who can focus on our individual physical needs. She has made a big contribution to my success this year,” stated javelin thrower Amanda Schumaker.


Since the coaches no longer are tasked with the designing and implementing of conditioning, “It lets the coaches be coaches and lets them focus on the sport,” stated Metzgar-Deacon.

 

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